Canon 1.6: Avoiding Privilege

A court professional shall use his or her official position solely for its intended purpose.

A court professional shall not use his or her position (intentionally or unintentionally), to secure unwarranted privileges or exemptions for oneself or others;

A court professional shall not dispense special favors to anyone, whether or not he or she was offered remuneration.

Comments

Two examples of how this canon would be violated include using one’s position to secure a job for a friend, or writing a complaint letter concerning a nonbusiness matter using court letterhead.

Other Codes

Section I (A) of the American Judicature Society’s 1989 Model Code of Conduct for Non–Judicial Court Employeesstates, “No employee shall use or attempt to use his or her official position to secure unwarranted privileges or exemptions for the employee or others.”

Canon 3 Guideline (a) of the New Jersey Code of Conduct for Judicial Employees calls on judicial employees not to, “Use or attempt to use the official position or the prestige of judicial affiliation to secure special privileges or exemptions for the employee or for others. For example, an employee shall not use official letterhead for private business correspondence, write letters of recommendation on official letterhead (other than when requested to give a reference on current or former coworkers or subordinates seeking new employment), nor carry a judiciary business card unless authorized by the appointing authority.”

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