Court Leader’s Advantage Podcasts

Coming innovations, thought-provoking trends, questions that matter to the court community, these and more themes are covered by the Court Leader’s Advantage podcast series, a forum by court professionals for court professionals to share experiences and lessons learned.

Podcasts will be available on the third Tuesday of every month.

Do you have questions or comments about Court Leader’s Advantage Podcasts? Contact clapodcast@nacmnet.org

PODCAST

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Examining Local Courts: Uncovering the Real Story

Released on Tuesday, July 20, 2021.

Local Courts are the least analyzed components of the American court system. This is particularly ironic since there are thousands of local courts, far more than there are courts of general jurisdiction. It has been estimated that they process over three and a half million criminal cases and collect at least two billion dollars in fines and fees annually.

When we talk about preserving the public’s trust and confidence in America’s courts, we often miss that most citizens gain their first-hand experience from dealing with a local court.

This month we are looking at three recent Harvard Law Review articles on local courts: Criminal Municipal Courts by Alexandra Natapoff, Kangaroo Courts by Shaun Ossei-Owusu, and Abolish Municipal Courts by Brendan Roediger.

Here to discuss their perspectives on these articles are folks who can honestly reveal the whole story on local courts. They are judges and court administrators all of whom work in municipal courts.

We are going to be looking at questions including:

  • Can and should we be collecting more data on local courts nationally?
  • Can the problem-solving model, fostered by many local courts, scale-up across the country?
  • Can local courts resist the pressure many cities impose to increase revenue?
  • What takeaways do these Judges and Court Administrators have for the rest of us?

Our panel today includes:

  • The Honorable Ed Spillane, Presiding Judge of the Municipal Court in College Station, Texas
  • The Honorable Mary Logan, Judge of the Municipal Court in Spokane, Washington
  • Rashida Davis, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Atlanta, Georgia
  • Courtney Whiteside, Court Administrator of the Municipal Court in St. Louis, Missouri
  • Bettye King, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Birmingham, Alabama.

Click here to listen to the podcast. Audio version is 34 minutes 17 seconds long.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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SHOW NOTES

>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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International Rule of Law Assignments: Asking Questions that Change Lives

Released on Tuesday, June 15, 2021.

Long days of travel, strange hotels, and strange food. Yes, international assignments can include all of these. But it can also afford the opportunity to make real change and create real change in yourself. This month we are talking to folks who have engaged in international rule of law assignments. In Russia, Ukraine, Serbia, Vietnam, and the South Pacific; these folks have been in countries around the world.

We’re asking questions about international work. Did the folks on assignment make a difference? What were the political and cultural hurdles they had to overcome? Do you need to know the language to go on assignment? What takeaways do these folks have for the rest of us?

Today’s contributors:

  • Michele Oken, Chair of NACM’s International Committee
  • Jeffrey Apperson, Vice President of the National Center for State Courts’ International Division

Our panel today includes:

  • Norman Meyer, CourtLeader contributor with 38 years of experience as a trial court administrator in the U.S. federal and state courts
  • Pam Harris, State Court Administrator for the Maryland Court System
  • Pamela Ryder-Lahey, Court Management Consultant with 41 years’ experience and most recently Chief Executive Officer for the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
  • John Cipperly, Senior Program Manager with the International Division of the National Center for State Courts
  • Janet Cornell, Court Consultant with over 35 years of experiences with both general and limited jurisdiction courts.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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SHOW NOTES

>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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NACM's International Committee Are You Ready for The Adventure?

Released on Tuesday, May 18, 2021.

International work can be challenging. It can also be very rewarding. No matter what, it is an adventure you will remember for the rest of your life. Have you thought about it? Wondered if it was for you? Where would you even go to get answers to your questions?

This month we are talking to folks who have served as consultants on rule of law assignments in countries across the globe. From Russia, to Vietnam, to the Pacific Islands, these panelists have seen it all. Now you will hear their stories first-hand. This episode will give you a taste of international work. We will also tell you about NACM’s own forum for people involved in international work and for those wanting to get involved: The NACM International Committee. In addition, you will learn about the National Center for State Court’s International Division and the outstanding work it is doing around the globe.

Today’s contributors:

  • Michele Oken, Chair of NACM’s International Committee
  • Jeffrey Apperson, Vice President of the National Center for State Courts’ International Division

Our panel today includes:

  • Norman Meyer, CourtLeader contributor with 38 years of experience as a trial court administrator in the U.S. federal and state courts
  • Pam Harris, State Court Administrator for the Maryland Court System
  • Pamela Ryder-Lahey, Court Management Consultant with 41 years’ experience and most recently Chief Executive Officer for the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
  • John Cipperly, Senior Program Manager with the International Division of the National Center for State Courts
  • Janet Cornell, Court Consultant with over 35 years of experiences with both general and limited jurisdiction courts.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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Is There a Key to Effective Communication? Let's Hear from You!

Released on Tuesday, April 27, 2021.

This week we are continuing our April 20th conversation with our panel on what is the key to effective communication, particularly during the pandemic. This week our panel covers topics including rumors and misinformation, the importance of “virtual water cooler” time, and the challenge of delivering unwelcome news.

You will remember that we asked you viewers to send in your thoughts on what was the key to effective communication. We received some great ideas, so we asked several folks to give us their advice on what makes for effective communication during the pandemic.

Today’s contributors:

  • LaShawn Thompson, Court Administrator for Oklahoma City Municipal Court
  • Joshua Larsen, Trial Court Supervisor, Dubuque, Iowa
  • Stacy Worby, Jury Coordinator for the Alaska Court System

Our co-host today is Alyce Roberts with the Alaska Court System.

Our panel today includes:

  • Zenell Brown, Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan
  • Rick Pierce, Judicial Programs Administrator for the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts
  • T.J. BeMent, District Court Administrator for the 10th Judicial District in Athens, Georgia
  • Elizabeth “Liz” Rambo, Trial Court Administrator for the Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Video version is 29 minutes 25 seconds.
Audio version is 28 minutes 28 seconds.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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SHOW NOTES

>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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Is There a Key to Effective Communication? Particularly During the Pandemic

Released on Tuesday, April 20, 2021.

It seems that at some point in every class the facilitator utters those words, “communication is key.” We all know however, that communication must be effective to make a difference. So, what is the key to making communication effective?

In this episode, we are going to explore communication. How to make it count. How to avoid wasting time for you and your employees. Specifically, we will look at:

  • How effective has court communication been during the pandemic?
  • Are there different approaches to effectively communicating with employees, with other justice stakeholders, and with the general public?
  • How can you obtain employee feedback in the age of Zoom meetings?
  • What can we learn from our panel of court administrators?

Our co-host today is Alyce Roberts with the Alaska Court System.

Our panel today includes:

  • Zenell Brown, Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan
  • Rick Pierce, Judicial Programs Administrator for the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts
  • T.J. BeMent, District Court Administrator for the 10th Judicial District in Athens, Georgia
  • Elizabeth “Liz” Rambo, Trial Court Administrator for the Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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SHOW NOTES

>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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What You Need to Know About Juvenile Detention and Placement Decision-Making and COVID

Released on Tuesday, March 16, 2021.

The Coronavirus has created a crisis in America’s jails and prisons. Many of these facilities have become COVID hotspots. Although sometimes overlooked, the pandemic also poses an enormous risk for juveniles who are detained. It is surprising to learn that, according to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, there were actually more young people in detention in December of last year than in April when the pandemic was new. And a greater proportion of those young people were Black and Latino.

To investigate this alarming situation, Drexel University and the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges have come together in a new project to 1) research juvenile risk assessment, risk reduction, and judicial decision-making during the pandemic; 2) develop a research-based plan to safely lower the numbers of young people confined in juvenile facilities; and 3) use that plan to motivate decision-makers to safely reduce the number of confinements, and therefore help manage the virus.

      • How can we benefit from the research these experts are conducting on judicial detention and placement decisions in the time of COVID?
      • How will this project change juvenile justice both during and after COVID?
      • What lessons have we learned and what advice do we have to share?

Our panel today includes:

      • The Honorable Gayl Branum Carr, Judge of the Fairfax Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court in Fairfax County, Virginia
      • Dr. Naomi Goldstein, Professor of Psychology, Co-Director of the Law and Psychology Program at Drexel University
      • Bob Bermingham, Director of the Court Services Unit at the Fairfax County Juvenile & Domestic Relations District Court.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

Video is 44 minutes and 30 seconds long. Audio is 42 minutes and 26 seconds long.

Click Here to Watch this Podcast

SHOW NOTES

>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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Telework: Is There A Secret to Effective Management?

Released on Thursday, February 18, 2021.

Back in October of 2019, for most courts, working remotely from home was a privilege granted to a small number of court employees. It seemed to be granted mostly to Court Technology workers and Executive Office staff who were working on some major project. Who would have thought that just six months later, courts across the country would be engaged in promoting telework to many if not most of their employees? This has been a profound cultural shift that is almost unheard of in court administration.

We now have close to a year’s experience with allowing telework on a widespread basis.

      • What has been the experience of court administrators and clerks of court with telework?
      • What productivity improvements have we seen?
      • What are the obstacles that we have encountered and how have we steered around them?
      • What lessons have we learned and what advice do we have to share?

We are talking with court administrators from around the country about the effect teleworking has had on the courts including the technological, cultural, and operational aspects of this dramatic shift in how court work gets done.

Co-Host:
Alyce Roberts, Special Projects Coordinator for the Alaska Court System

Our panel of Court Administrators have each had diverse experiences with teleworking within their courts. Our panel includes:

      • Sam Hamrick, Court Executive Officer with the Superior Court in Riverside, California
      • Terri March, Court Administrator with the Justice Court in North Las Vegas, Nevada
      • Courtney Whiteside, Director with the Municipal Court in St. Louis, Missouri
      • Debbie Spradley, Trial Court Administrator with the Clackamas County Circuit Court in Oregon City, Oregon

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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SHOW NOTES

>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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Local Courts: Their Complex Issues and How Are They Solving Them? Bonus Episode

Released on Thursday, January 28, 2021.

Welcome to a bonus episode on how local courts are facing and solving their many complex issues. As mentioned in last week’s episode, these local suburban and rural jurisdictions are very often the representative of the judicial branch in much of America. We are continuing our conversation with clerks of court and court administrators from one and two judge courts around the country. We are chatting about the current issues facing local courts including automated case management systems, teleconferencing, telework, and training in smaller jurisdictions. How are these courts managing those issues, and what advice they have for the rest of us?

Our panelists include:

      • Angie VanSchoick, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Breckenridge, Colorado
      • Saundra Berry, Clerk of Court for the Municipal Court in Cleveland Heights, Ohio
      • Kelly S. Elliott, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Lee’s Summit, Missouri
      • Lindsey Forshee, the Superior Court Administrator for the Tifton Judicial Circuit in Georgia
      • Danielle Trujillo, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Littleton, Colorado

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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SHOW NOTES

> Additional Resources
>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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Local Courts: Their Complex Issues and How Are They Solving Them?

Released on Thursday, January 21, 2021.

When we talk about the challenges confronting America’s judicial branch, we often focus on the concerns and accomplishments of large metropolitan courts. After all, they are often the ones that have more money and more resources to throw at a problem. However, a survey conducted several years ago, revealed that almost 65% of all courts in the United States had benches of fewer than four judges.

In a large portion of our country, these local suburban and often rural jurisdictions, these local courts are the representative of the judicial branch. How are these local courts solving their problems? How are they coping with the issues of the day with less staff, less money, often shared facilities, and frequently government entities that are somewhat less respectful of the court as being a separate branch of government?

Our panel of Clerks of Court and Court Administrators from one and two judge courts chat about their current issues, how they are managing those issues, and what advice they have for the rest of us. Our panelists include:

      • Angie VanSchoick, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Breckenridge, Colorado
      • Saundra Berry, Clerk of Court for the Municipal Court in Cleveland Heights, Ohio
      • Kelly S. Elliott, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Lee’s Summit, Missouri
      • Lindsey Forshee, the Superior Court Administrator for the Tifton Judicial Circuit in Georgia
      • Danielle Trujillo, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Littleton, Colorado

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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SHOW NOTES

> Additional Resources
>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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Wildfires, Protests, and COVID: How Have Courts Coped with Compounding Crises? Part Two

Released on Thursday, December 17, 2020.

Part two of a conversation with our panel of court administrators whose courts have endured multiple concurrent crises. They had to deal with questions of allowing protestors into the courthouse because it is a public building while worrying about vandalism. They struggled to maintain a semblance of an operation with courthouses that were closed for months at a time. They had to keep air circulation open to eliminate the Coronavirus yet close the vents to prevent breathing in wildfire smoke. We have so much to learn from their solutions they crafted.

What did they and their courts have to go through?
How are they modifying their future contingency plans?
What can we learn from what they have had to endure?

Co-Host:
Alyce Roberts, Retired Special Projects Coordinator for the Alaska Court System.

The panel includes:

      • Barbara Marcille is the Trial Court Administrator in the Circuit Court for the 4th Judicial District in Portland, Oregon
      • Michael Roddy is the Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in San Diego County, California
      • Elizabeth Baldwin is the Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Seattle, Washington
      • Bob Fleshman is the Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in Napa County, California
      • Elizabeth Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for the Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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SHOW NOTES

>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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Wildfires, Protests, and COVID: How Have Courts Coped with Compounding Crises? Part One

Released on Thursday, November 19, 2020.

Unbelievably, the expression “we are living in unprecedented times” has become a cliché. Since early 2020, so much has happened to us, so quickly, and with so little warning that the only response anyone seems to have is “Well, now what?”. Still, because so many extraordinary events have occurred this year, 2020 has much to teach us.

We are talking with court administrators whose courts have endured nightly violent demonstrations that have lasted for months, wildfires that have turned day to night and made the air unbreathable and, of course, the Coronavirus. This is part one of two episodes where our panel shares the lessons they have experienced first-hand.

What can we learn from the experiences of these courageous court administrators, their staffs, and their courts? How will they update their Continuity of Operations Plans? What advice do they have for the rest of us?

Co-Host:
Alyce Roberts, Retired Special Projects Coordinator for the Alaska Court System.

The panel includes:

      • Barbara Marcille is the Trial Court Administrator in the Circuit Court for the 4th Judicial District in Portland, Oregon
      • Michael Roddy is the Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in San Diego County, California
      • Elizabeth Baldwin is the Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Seattle, Washington
      • Bob Fleshman is the Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in Napa County, California
      • Elizabeth Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for the Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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SHOW NOTES

> Additional Resources
>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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BONUS EPISODE: Court Professionals and Protests: What Should You Be Thinking About Now?

Released on Thursday, November 12, 2020.

Our July Court Leader’s Advantage video podcast episode on courts and protest marches has garnered considerable interest. Over 300 viewers have accessed the episode. Among those who watched the episode was Norman Meyer, Retired Clerk of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of New Mexico, who wrote in two questions to ask about court employees, protest marches, our first amendment rights, and the NACM Model Code of Conduct. Norman joins the episode to ask his two questions.

The panel to respond includes:
• Elisa Chinn-Gary, Clerk of the Superior Court in Mecklenburg County (Charlotte, North Carolina).
• Sarah Brown-Clark, Elected Clerk for the Municipal Court (Youngstown, Ohio).
• Elizabeth Baldwin, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Seattle, Washington.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

Click Here to Watch this Podcast

SHOW NOTES

>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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Diversity and Inclusion: Why Is It Even More Important Now? Part Two

Released on Friday, October 16, 2020.

For decades we court professionals have committed ourselves to the practice diversity and inclusion. We make this commitment to earn the public’s trust and confidence in our nation’s courts. This dedication is ongoing; the work still continues.

The goals of diversity and inclusion affirm our pledge to fairness, equity, impartiality, trust, and accountability. They also enhance decision-making, innovation, resiliency, responsiveness, employee engagement, and the delivery of services. Courts are constantly confronted by the demand for more access, the desire for equality, and the erosion of that very public trust and confidence we have pledged to earn.

What can we do to strengthen our core values? What can we do to use diversity and inclusion as a way to solve today’s problems? What do we see on the horizon for courts as they struggle to address these issues every day?

Co-Host:
Zenell Brown, Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan.

The panel includes:

      • Marcia M. Anderson recently retired as Clerk of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Wisconsin.
      • Hector Gonzalez is the Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in Tuolumne County, California.
      • Norman Meyer retired after serving for 38 years as a court administrator in both the state and Federal systems. Most recently, he was Clerk of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of New Mexico.
      • Jose Octavio Guillen retired after serving for 42 years as the Court Executive Officer and Jury Commissioner for the Superior Courts in Sonoma, Napa, Riverside, and Imperial Counties, California.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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> Additional Resources
>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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Diversity and Inclusion: Why Is It Even More Important Now? Part One

Released on Friday, September 18, 2020.

Over the last forty years, our nation’s courts have been committed to diversity and inclusion, in order to live up to the ideals of fairness and equality, and to build public trust and confidence. While we can point to many improvements, there is still much work to be done.

The lessons learned from diversity and inclusion practices point to benefits beyond just furthering the institutional values of fairness, equity, impartiality, trust, and accountability. They also improve decision-making, innovation, resiliency, responsiveness, employee engagement, and delivery of services.

Institutions like courts today are challenged by the spread of global pandemics, the demand for more access, the desire for more equitable outcomes, and the erosion of public trust and confidence in government.

Diversity and inclusion should be at the forefront to harness new solutions and to turn challenges into opportunities. What can we do to strengthen our institutional values and apply concrete diversity and inclusion practices to the problems we face today? What advice do we have for court administrators and clerks of court around the country dealing with these issues on a daily basis?

Co-Host:
Zenell Brown, Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan.

The panel includes:

      • Marcia M. Anderson recently retired as Clerk of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Wisconsin.
      • Hector Gonzalez is the Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in Tuolumne County, California.
      • Norman Meyer retired after serving for 38 years as a court administrator in both the state and Federal systems. Most recently, he was Clerk of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of New Mexico.
      • Jose Octavio Guillen retired after serving for 42 years as the Court Executive Officer and Jury Commissioner for the Superior Courts in Sonoma, Napa, Riverside, and Imperial Counties, California.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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> Additional Resources
>About the Presenters

PODCAST

August podcast

Courts and Systemic Bias: What Lessons Have We Learned? Part Two

Released on August 28, 2020

Welcome to part two of the Court Leader’s Advantage podcast on Courts and Systemic Bias. We continue to look at the state of our courts regarding systemic bias and what advice we have for others moving forward. The panel discusses the specifics regarding systemic bias and expungements, fines and fees, evictions, allowing ex-felons the vote, and the need for better racial sensitivity training.

Charleston Carter, Trial Court Administrator for the 26th Judicial District in Mecklenburg County, (Charlotte, North Carolina) co-hosts.

This panel includes:

        • The Honorable John Pacheco, Judge of the Superior Court for San Bernardino County (California).
        • Alena Clark with the Prosecutor’s Office in Genesee County (Michigan).
        • Linda Romero-Soles, Retired Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in Merced County (California).
        • Elisa Chinn-Gary, Clerk of the Superior Court in Mecklenburg County (Charlotte, North Carolina).

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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SHOW NOTES

> Additional Resources
>About the Presenters

PODCAST

August podcast

Courts and Systemic Bias: What Lessons Have We Learned? Part One

Released on August 20, 2020

Since the death of George Floyd, this nation has agonized with divided perceptions of police and criminal justice.  One perception sees systemic bias, mostly centered on law enforcement, with problems that need institutional change. The other perception sees isolated events that need individual investigations and limited corrections.

Although the courts have not been in the spotlight recently, this might be a good time for some introspection.  Can the impartiality of courts remain intact or is this is an opportunity for proactive improvement?  What is the state of our courts regarding systemic bias?  What advice do we have for moving forward?

This month’s co-host is Charleston Carter, Trial Court Administrator for the 26th Judicial District in Mecklenburg County, (Charlotte, North Carolina)

This month’s panel includes:

          • The Honorable John Pacheco, Judge of the Superior Court for San Bernardino County (California).
          • Alena Clark with the Prosecutor’s Office in Genesee County (Michigan).
          • Linda Romero-Soles, Retired Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in Merced County (California).
          • Elisa Chinn-Gary, Clerk of the Superior Court in Mecklenburg County (Charlotte, North Carolina).

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

Click Here to Watch this Podcast

SHOW NOTES

> Additional Resources
>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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Court Professional and Protests: What Should You Be Thinking About Now?

Released on July 16, 2020

Since the May 25th death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, emotions in this country have been rubbed raw. There have been protest marches in all 50 states, which have led to some unique tensions for America’s trial courts. The First Amendment to the Constitution guarantees the right of freedom of speech and to peaceably assemble and petition for redress of grievances. The NACM Model Code of Conduct for Court Professionals Canon 4.1 advises “A court professional does not use his or her position or title within the court system to influence others” along with the provision that “A court professional engages in political activity strictly as a private citizen and only in accordance with Federal law, state law, local court rule, and policy of the appropriate local governing authority.” This Canon is augmented by a view many in the court community hold that a court professional is always a representative of the court, whether or not they are on the job at the courthouse.

As a Clerk of Court or a Court Administrator, what advice would you give to your employees? What are the ethical implications of employees wanting to join protest marches? Is there a model policy that we could use as a best practice? What advice is there for court professionals around the country who might be facing these very questions?

This month’s panel includes:
• Elisa Chinn-Gary, Clerk of the Superior Court in Mecklenburg County (Charlotte, North Carolina).
• Sarah Brown-Clark, Elected Clerk for the Municipal Court (Youngstown, Ohio).
• Jeff Chapple, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court (O’Fallon, Missouri).
• Elizabeth Baldwin, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Seattle, Washington.

Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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SHOW NOTES

>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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The Coronavirus: How Are Courts Coping with the Crisis?

The scourge of the Coronavirus is a national emergency unlike anything we have seen in modern times. It is affecting all aspects of our lives and work. The virus is having a profound impact on how American courts are coping. Throughout the crisis, we will have weekly podcast episodes with a “rotating panel” of guests that will answer the question, “How are courts and court administrators dealing with the coronavirus on a daily basis?”

Episodes 1-13 are available at the link below.

Leave a comment or question about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

Click Here for this Podcast Series

PODCAST

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Can Courts Lead in Solving the Opioid Crisis?

To Be Released on March 19, 2020

Over 10 million Americans misused opioids in 2018, which includes over 800,000 heroin users. In 2016, there were more than 64,000 overdose deaths in the United States; in 2017 overdose deaths jumped to over 70,000. This is a number that continues to grow in at least 23 states. Opioid addiction is a crisis that defies age and sex differences; it defies county and state lines; up to now it has defied all attempts to curb this plague. No one questions that opioid addiction is a national crisis and it is not slacking off.

Are the nation’s courts ready to take the lead in fighting this epidemic? What needs to be done and who should do it?

Judge O. Duane Slone with the Circuit Court in the Fourth Judicial District of Tennessee and Director Deborah Taylor Tate, head of the Administrative Office of the Courts for the Supreme Court of Tennessee and Co-Chair of the National Judicial Opioid Task Force, will discuss the recent Task Force Report and the efforts by the Nation’s Courts to take the lead in solving this countrywide crisis.

This is an interesting podcast episode for listeners concerned about opioid addiction, drug eradication efforts, drug treatment, treatment and problem-solving courts, and court administration.

Leave a comment or question about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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Is It Time for a Fresh Look at Cell Phones and Courts?

To Be Released February 20, 2020

For better or worse we can no longer live without our Smartphones. We use them to talk and text our friends; they keep our appointments, pictures, and business notes; they help us with research; they track of our children; they allow us to call 911 in an emergency. It’s a wonder how we ever lived without them, yet they have been here a mere 13 years, arriving in 2007.

Smartphones have become a part of court process. They carry messages, photos, and information that are evidence in court hearings and trials. Yet, many courts forbid people from even having them in the courthouse. Must courts accept that Smartphones are everywhere? Is there a middle ground that can be reached?

Judge Cynthia Cohen, Retired Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Appeals Court, Jeffrey Morrow, Director of Security for the Massachusetts Trial Courts. And TJ BeMent, District Court Administrator for the 10th Judicial Administrative District in Athens, Georgia share their insights and conclusions about this critical issue.

This is an interesting podcast episode for listeners curious about Smartphones, courtroom security, self-represented defendants, courts, and court administration.

Leave a comment or question about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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>About the Presenters

PODCAST

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Is Bail Reform Working? Charlotte’s Revealing Story

To Be Released January 16, 2020
It has been estimated that nationally, more than 60 percent of people in jail have not been convicted of a crime, they are awaiting trial. Almost 500,000 defendants are in jail pretrial because they cannot afford to post bail. Three-quarters of pretrial detainees have been charged with a drug or property crime. They could remain incarcerated for days, months, and sometimes even years. They could lose their jobs, lose contact with loved ones, and lose the ability to care for their families. Many courts across the country are implementing bail reform. Bail reform allows more defendants charged with lower-level crimes to stay out of jail before trial, stay on their jobs, and stay in the community. What has been the experience of those courts that have implemented bail reform? Judge Roy Wiggins and Judge Elizabeth Trosch, from North Carolina’s 26th Judicial District in the City of Charlotte, discuss their Court’s experience implementing bail reform. How is it working and what we can expect?

This is an intriguing podcast episode for listeners curious about bail, bail reform, managing pretrial defendants, courts, and court administration.

Leave a comment or question about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

Click Here to Listen to this Podcast

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Dealing with the Generations: What Do Good Managers Understand?

Released December 19, 2019
Managing the multigenerational workplace is more demanding today than ever before. Why has it become such a challenge? One reason is that we are living and working longer. Today, we can expect to live 18 years longer (79 years old) than if we were born in 1935. Second, technology is changing our lives and the rate of that change is increasing. Once, just being a 30-year veteran of an organization made you a valued expert. Today, we value the technological skills to master artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, and social media. Does assigning traits to the different generations help or hurt in managing the workplace? What insights do we have for today’s managers with up to four generations working side-by-side? Zenell Brown, Alisa Shannon, Rene Armenta, and Kelly Hutton discuss what it means to oversee a court with so many different age groups working together.

This is an absorbing podcast episode for listeners curious about generational differences, managing the generations, courts, and court administration.

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Social Media and the Courts: How Do We Deal with This Growing Reality?

Released November 21, 2019
Blogs and podcasts are a growing fixture on our social landscape. There are now more than 750,000 podcasts produced and over 48 million people a week listen to a podcast. Estimates are that billions of people worldwide read one or more blogs on the internet. This is a fact that courts face along with all government institutions. When grappling with the media, courts can no longer deal simply with the city newspaper and local television reporters. Bloggers and podcasters demand equal treatment with traditional media outlets. What advice do we have for courts that are facing the challenge of social media’s blogs and podcasts? Darren Toms and Stephen Thompson talk about how courts can deal with the growing phenomenon of social media’s focus on the justice system.

This is a fascinating podcast episode for listeners interested in courts, court administration, social media, blogs, and podcasts.

Leave a comment or question about the episode at Contact clapodcast@nacmnet.org

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What Generation X and Millennials are Saying About the Workplace: Three Perspectives

Released October 17, 2019
The Pew Research Center has estimated that there are right now more Millennials than Baby Boomers in America. By 2030 Millennials and Gen Zs will make up 75% of the workforce. A Gallup Poll found that 21% of Millennials had changed jobs within the last year, that’s three times more than other generations. On top of this demographic shift, technological innovation is increasing exponentially. The American workforce is racing toward a major generational transformation within the next ten years. Will the emerging generations demand new ways of doing business and managing employees? How will the generations impact the courts? What can court administrators do today to prepare for this sea change? Tina Mattison, Stacy Worby, and Paulina Pasquarelli talk about the up-and-coming generations as they flex their social and economic muscle. What they will mean to management and the workplace.

This is a compelling podcast episode for listeners interested in generational differences, managing the generations, courts, and court administration.

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Suddenly He Was There: Is Your Court Prepared for a Shooting Tragedy?

Released September 19, 2019
Shooting incidents are becoming a scourge on the American landscape and courthouses are certainly not immune. An incident can last only seconds but the trauma to court staff and the unsuspecting public can live on and on. If a calamity occurs, we face the triple challenge: emergency decisions and communications, dealing with law enforcement and a crime scene, and maintaining or reestablishing ongoing operations. What can your staff and your court do to prepare? What do we keep in mind if it happens? What can we learn from professionals who have dealt with these issues in real time? Patricia Norwood Foden, Lt. Adam Sibley, Lance Wilson, and Deputy U.S. Marshal Addison Friedman talk about working through tragedy and restoring a degree of normalcy.

This is an intriguing episode for listeners interested in emergencies, active shooter situations, courthouse security, and court administration.

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The Network’s On the Phone: Pulling Back the Curtain on High Profile Trials

From O.J. Simpson, to Trayvon Martin and Casey Anthony, we have become used to the media targeting trials and turning them into spectacles. Many in the public see them as entertainment; often they become a lightning rod for political controversy. All the while jurors must be protected and citizens must be able to conduct their regular business with the court. These challenges can prove an enormous test for a typical trial court. When do you know a trial will turn into a media event? What can your court do to prepare? Michelle Kennedy and Karen Levey share their experiences dealing with high profile trials in their courts.

This is an intriguing episode for listeners interested in high profile trials, media relations, jury security, and court administration.

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Held for Ransom: How Safe is Your Data?

Released July 18, 2019

Ransomware attacks are running rampant throughout the nation. Atlanta, Georgia; Lake City, Florida; Albany, New York; and Del Rio, Texas have all been victims. Most recently the Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts was attacked. Local agencies can be crippled for weeks with no data, no internet, no email, and no way to conduct business. Is your court prepared? Can you stop it? How would you even know? Rashida Davis and Stephen Nevels recount their experiences battling attacks on their courts.

This is a fascinating episode for listeners interested in cybersecurity, ransomware such as Ryuk and Sam Sam, court technology, and court administration.

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Is AI Already Here? The Answers May Startle You

You may not be aware, but artificial intelligence (AI) has already established itself in our daily lives. From Amazon to Alexa, sophisticated algorithms affect much of what we do. The next ten years will see advancements in electronic decision-making, facial recognition, language translation, and voice-to-text. Are you willing to accept the cost in loss of privacy due to AI’s insatiable thirst for data for the benefit in added productivity? What will be the new careers in AI world? Abhijeet Chavan and IV Ashton walk us through some of the inner workings of AI, some expectations in areas like Natural Language Processing, and give us advice on how to prepare for the future of this technology.

This is a fascinating episode for listeners interested in court technology, Natural Language Processing, algorithms, individual privacy, language translation, and emerging technologies.

There is a link to a short segment of the book Prediction Machines by Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, Avi Goldfarb, in the Show Notes section on our website.

Leave a comment or question about the podcast at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.

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> Additional Resources to Learn More About Artificial Intelligence
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Blockchain: Is It Your Court’s Future

Blockchain is a business and accounting tool that has the prospect of changing the way organizations handle money. Its built-in safeguards prevent electronic hacking of financial accounts. Beyond accounting, it has the potential for securing the authenticity of court documents and even identities. But are we willing to pay the cost of Blockchain technology? Paul Embley and Di Graski explore the opportunities to courts and the limits of this technology.

This is a fascinating episode for listeners interested in trial courts, court administration, emerging technologies, digital security, and accounting and finance, and emergency response plans.

A link to Di and Paul’s paper, “When Might Blockchain Appear in Your Court?” is in the Show Notes section on our website.

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CLA Podcast Bonus: When Might Blockchain Appear in Your Court

To Be Released May 16, 2019

“The verifiable integrity of Blockchain records, linked and secured using cryptography, could soon be used in a variety of innovative ways to resolve court recordkeeping challenges. At the same time, Blockchain presents new legal issues that courts must be prepared to address.” This is an audio recitation of a paper written by Di Graski and Paul Embley titled “When Might Blockchain Appear in Your Court?” The paper appeared in the 2018 edition of Trends in State Courts published by the National Center for State Courts.

This episode will appeal to listeners interested in trial courts, court administration, emerging technologies, digital security, and accounting and finance, and emergency response plans.

A link to a display version of Di and Paul’s paper, “When Might Blockchain Appear in Your Court?” is in the Show Notes section on our website.

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Alaska’s Earthquake: Its Surprising Lessons

April 2019

Friday, November 30, 2018, Anchorage, Alaska, suffered a magnitude 7.1 earthquake followed by thousands of aftershocks. Though we always think of California when we think earthquakes, this quake was larger than the infamous 1989 Loma Prieta event (a.k.a. the World Series Quake). Alaska was also the site of the 1964 Good Friday quake: the most powerful earthquake ever to hit the United States. How did the Alaska Court System’s emergency response plans hold up when put to the test of a major quake? What can we take away from Alaska’s experience and its preparations?

Christine Johnson and Alyce Roberts share their experiences and their insights having dealt firsthand with this powerful force of nature.

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Artificial Intelligence: What You Need to Know Now

March 2019

Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) has already brought us general business tools that courts can use to assist in automating work, analyzing documents, and conducting legal analysis. As a start, courts will need to put their information into an electronic format that can be used by A.I. tools. They will also need to re-engineer their business practices. Small courts will have to be assertive in making their needs known. But, exactly how will A.I. tools help courts and what will we, as citizens, give up in privacy in order to maximize A.I.’s potential? Alan Carlson along with co-host Rick Pierce discuss how A.I. will be used in the courts and how soon it will be here.

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> Additional Resources to Learn More About A.I.
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Hurricane Florence

What Hurricane Florence Can Teach Us

February 2019

Last September, Hurricane Florence devastated North Carolina’s families, its communities, and its courts. There had to be “contingency plans for contingency plans” in order to deal with a storm that upended lives and work. Court Administrators Ellen Hancox and Caitlin Emmons talk about how their courts and their families endured and how their continuity of operations plans held up in the face of flooded facilities and judges who had not yet fully recovered from the previous hurricane (Matthew). Ellen and Caitlin share good advice for all of us from their experience.

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YOUR HOST

Peter Kiefer

NACM Podcast Host


Peter C. Kiefer is a career court veteran with over 40 years experience working with trial courts in Oregon, Arizona, and California. He has been an administrator in general jurisdiction and limited jurisdiction trial courts; he has also worked for state court administrative offices in both Oregon and California. He has consulted with the judicial systems in Liberia, Moldova, and Beirut, Lebanon, as well as being a member of a NACM delegation to visit the People’s Republic of China. Peter graduated from Santa Clara University with his bachelor’s degree in Political Science, received his Master’s of Public Administration with a specialty in Court Administration from the University of Southern California. In 2016 he became a Fellow of the Institute for Court Management. In 2015 Peter was given the NACM Award of Merit.

Do you have questions or comments about Court Leader’s Advantage Podcasts? Contact clapodcast@nacmnet.org

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